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Essential Questions:
Was the Civil War unavoidable?How did the Civil War impact minority rights activism for future generations? Was the Civil War fought to "free the slaves" or to "prevent the breakup of the Union"? Did Lincoln win the war with metaphors? Was Reconstruction an ignoble failure or an idealistic if failed experiment? Big Ideas:
1. You will understand how both sides mobilized for war, and what that mobilization revealed about the nature and character of each.
2. You will understand how the North won the Civil War.

Key knowledge goals: You will be able to explain each of these in some detail
1. The ways in which the Confederate States of America compared with the United States in manpower, natural resources, finances, industrial potential, and public support.
2. The significant legislation enacted by Congress once Southern members were no longer a factor.
3. The considerations involved in President Lincoln's decision to issue the Emancipation Proclamation, and its reception in the North, in the South, and in Europe.
4. The basic structure of the government of the Confederate States of America, how it differed from that of the United States, and how it dealt with the vital question of states' rights.
5. The efforts of Presidents Lincoln and Jefferson Davis to act as commander in chief under their respective constitutions.
6. How African culture and knowledge helped to shape the war 7. Understand how the underground railroad and other grassroots movements helped to free slaves Advanced knowledge goals:
8. How other nations, particularly England and France, viewed the struggle, and how their courses of action affected the outcome.
9. How the American Civil War was part of a worldwide movement to create large, consolidated nations.
Skills: You will learn and be able to apply each of these skills Key: Basic APA formatting Advanced essay introduction "hook" and thesis Annotation skillsUnderstand and be able to create a Rhetorical Precis Advanced: AP Level Critical Document AnalysisUnderstand and be able to create a Rhetorical Precis Honors Option: Honors Option Participants must attend two afterschool sessions and complete work assigned at these sessions Monday, November 8th Afterschool Monday, November 15th Afterschool To receive honors credit, you must pass the honors exam with a “B” or better Need some extra help? Civil War and English Skill help available afterschool Wednesdays and Thursdays


Assignment # 1

Sources:


Questions:
  1. Explain the various interpretations that historians have advanced to explain why the Civil War took place.
  2. How have these interpretations followed the general outlines laid down by Senator William H. Seward in 1858?
  3. Create a CHART which analyzes the advantages and disadvantages of the North and the South in terms of their readiness for war.
  4. How did the Republican Party act to expand the American economy during the war? To which pre-war party was their program similar? Why were they able to enact it, whereas the previous party had not been successful?
  5. How did the Union propose to finance the war? How successful was this? What was the effect on the economy?
  6. How did the Union propose to raise troops? To what extent was it forced to use conscription? How did the nation react to this method?
  7. What was Lincoln's view of the extent of presidential war powers?
  8. Who were the opponents war in the North? How did Lincoln use his powers against them? What was the outcome?
  9. For what reason was the "Union Party" created? Who were its candidates?
  10. What were the two factions trying to control the Republican Party? What were their goals? Which group did Lincoln support?
  11. How was this split in the Republican Party revealed in the debate over what to do about slavery? What action did each faction propose? What was Lincoln's response to each faction?
  12. What factors, other than political pressure, brought about the Emancipation Proclamation? What did the proclamation really accomplish?
  13. What role did African Americans play in support of the Union cause?
  14. What impact did the Civil War have on the Northern industrial economy? on women in the North?
  15. What part did women play in the Union war effort?

Terms:

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Assignment #2

Sources:

Questions:
  1. What were the origins of the Confederate government? How did its constitution differ from that of the United States?
  2. What problems did the new leaders of the Confederacy face?
  3. How did the Confederacy attempt to finance the war?
  4. How did the Confederacy propose to raise troops for the war? How did these plans compare with those of the Union? How successful were they?
  5. Why was states' rights the "great dividing force" i the Confederacy's war effort? What caused this division? What was the effect?
  6. How did the Civil War "transform" Southern society? How was this transformation like that which took place in the North? How was it different?
  7. What impact did the war have on the lives and circumstances of women? of slaves?
  8. Explain the 19c worldwide movement to create large, consolidated nations. How did the American Civil War fit into this movement?
  9. What does the popularity of baseball indicate about America at the time of the Civil War?
  10. Why was Lincoln more successful at organizing a command system than Davis?
  11. What role did Lincoln propose for the United States Navy? How did the Confederacy attempt to overcome this naval advantage?
  12. What were the foreign-policy objectives of the Union and of the Confederacy? How did each attempt to achieve these objectives? Which was most successful and why?

How did the West play a continuing political, diplomatic, and military part in the conflict?

Terms:


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Assignment #3

Sources:


Questions:
  1. How did advances in the effectiveness of arms and artillery change the way soldiers in the field fought?
  2. What was the response of the border states to the outbreak of war?
  3. Why was the outcome of the First Battle of Bull Run [First Manassas] such a shock? What did it reveal about the possibility of an early end to the struggle and about the readiness of the two sides for a major conflict?
  4. What were the strengths and weaknesses of General George McClellan's military leadership? of General Robert E. Lee's military leadership?
  5. What was the Union plan for the conquest of the West? How did the Confederates propose to defend this area?
  6. How did the battle of Shiloh change Grant's thinking about his military plans?
  7. Why was the Battle of Antietam considered to be one of the turning points in the war?
  8. Why was 1863 the "Year of Decision?"
  9. What was Grant's grand strategy for 1864? What were his objectives?
  10. How was the Confederacy finally defeated? In what way did the Union forces destroy the South's will to carry on the fight?

Terms:









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    • Quizzes:

      1. Textbook Quizzes --> chapter 14

      1. Quizzes --> A B

    • Outlines / Lecture Notes / Review Sheets:


      1. Prof. David McGee (Central Virginia Community College) lecture notes on:
        * The Civil War (Through 1862)
        * The Civil War -- The Home Front
        * The Civil War -- The Bloody War

      1. Note Cards --> 601-650
      2. Presidential Election Data --> 1860 1864
>>

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Ten Commandments of Good Historical Writing
College Board A. P. U. S. History Main Page (.pdf file)
Civil War Project
Goal: To learn, apply, and teach essential knowledge and skills in regards to the Civil War; to prepare and exhibit our knowledge in a creative, individual way.
Task: You task is three fold. You will be responsible for:
One key knowledge goal (to be presented during class as part of group project)
One cultural aspect of the Civil War (to be presented on Exhibition Night)
Individual Character Presentation (to be researched and presented at exhibition)
Required Elements: As Juniors, you are expected to know and be able to exhibit high level aspects of planning and presentation. With this in mind, you will not be receiving a detailed list of your tasks – rather, you are expected to create an informative, well organized, creative presentation demonstrating your knowledge of the topic, and your ability to transfer this knowledge to your classmates. That being said, here are a few ideas to consider:
Knowledge: make a movie; create a handout; create a PowerPoint presentation; create a quiz; create a storyboard; create a timeline; create a diorama; write a play; make a commercial; create a ballot initiative; create a campaign; Theme presentation ex. “Hell’s Kitchen”; etc.
Culture: create a paper mache representation; create a billboard; create a 3-D representation; create scene set; create a graphic novel; create a political cartoon; create large scale political cartoon or historical document; etc.
Individual: dress as character; write a speech; recite characters writing; recite characters poetry; tell a story about your character; act out dramatic scene; etc.
NOTE: While I am not setting specific guidelines, please know I expect greatness. A high level combination of elements is expected for all aspects of the project. For example, a high level project lesson might go as follows: A short introductory movie clip, a PowerPoint lesson, a handout, and a quiz.
ALL PROJECTS MUST ADDRESS AT LEAST TWO CIVIL WAR ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS (found on wiki page) IN THE CLASSROOM PRESENTATION!


Group One:
Knowledge (a.k.a. teaching topic): the ways in which the Confederate States of America compared with the United States in manpower, natural resources, finances, industrial potential, and public support.
Culture: Using your research, construct a creative representation of the conflict between the United States and The Confederate States of America. (to be displayed at exhibition)
Group Two:
Knowledge (a.k.a. teaching topic): The significant legislation enacted by Congress once Southern members were no longer a factor.
Culture: Using your research, construct a creative representation of Congressional Legislation (to be displayed at exhibition, can be a representation of one particular piece of legislation)
Group Three:
Knowledge (a.k.a. teaching topic): The considerations involved in President Lincoln's decision to issue the Emancipation Proclamation, and its reception in the North, in the South, and in Europe.
Culture: Using your research, construct a creative representation of
P. 1/2 Europe’s view of the Emancipation Proclamation (to be displayed at exhibition)
P. 3/4 The Emancipation Proclamation (to be displayed at exhibition)
Group Four:
Knowledge (a.k.a. teaching topic): The basic structure of the government of the Confederate States of America, how it differed from that of the United States, and how it dealt with the vital question of states' rights.
Culture: Using your research, construct a creative representation of
P. 1/2 The Confederate States of America (to be displayed at exhibition)
P. 3/4 The United States of America (to be displayed at exhibition)
Group Five:
Knowledge (a.k.a. teaching topic): The efforts of Presidents Lincoln and Jefferson Davis to act as commander in chief under their respective constitutions.
Culture: Using your research, construct a creative representation of
P. 1/2 President Lincoln (to be displayed at exhibition)
P. 3/4 President Jefferson Davis (to be displayed at exhibition)
Group Six:
Knowledge (a.k.a. teaching topic): How African culture and knowledge helped to shape the war
Culture: Using your research, construct a creative representation of
P. 1/2 African American Poetry (to be recited at exhibition)
P. 3/4 African American Song (to be sung at exhibition)
Group Seven:
Knowledge (a.k.a. teaching topic): Understand how the Underground Railroad and other grassroots movements helped to free slaves. Understand the South’s reactionary movements to stop these efforts.
Culture: Using your research, construct a creative representation of
P. 1/2 A literal railroad (to lead our guests to the classroom at exhibition)
P. 3/4 Harriet Tubman (to be displayed at exhibition at the entrance to our classroom)

Individual Participation: You must participate in exhibition as one of the following characters. You will be required to research your character, dress as your character, and convey your “story” to our visitors.
Wounded/Dead Soldiers (6)
Harriet Tubman (1)
Jefferson Davis (1)
Abraham Lincoln (1)
Free Slaves (4)
Slaves (4)
Underground Railroad Guide (6)
Plantation Owners (2)
Northern Business Owners (2)
Team Leader inside (1)
Team Leader outside (1)